Classic film cameras from my personal collection & photo apparatus for sale


1 Superb Rolleiflex 3.5 medium format camera kit; NOW SOLD!

2 Nice, solid Zorki 35mm classic rangefinder; click here!

3 Immaculate Olympus 35SP rangefinder camera kit;  SOLD

4 Olympus 35RC classic pocket rangefinder camera kit; click here

6 Complete 35mm/120 film and print developing kit; click here

7 Photographic paper & other darkroom supplies; click here

8 Pentax Auto 110 miniature camera kit; click here

9 Beautiful miniature Olympus XA camera kit; click here

10 Selection of Olympus Trip 35 cameras; click here

11 Yashicamat 24 medium format camera kit; NOW SOLD!

12 World famous RODINAL developer..yes, its true! click here

13 High quality Voigtlander Vito II vintage camera; click SOLD

14 Yashica Electro 35 high quality rangefinder, excellent, click here

I now accept credit/debit card payments via Google Checkout

Hi, folks! Rather than just keeping adding to my posts here every time I decide to offer a camera for sale, I have left this page permanently as the first one you come to when you come to my blog; it shows you what I am offering for sale without you having to navigate all round the blog just to find out!

A new refinement to the blog is how you can make your purchases — you can either purchase your camera by emailing me directly on harsum888 at yahoo dot com, or leaving a comment here on this blog OR you can click on that photo of an Olympus 35SP camera, just on your right hand side of the blog here, right underneath the world map….that’ll take you to my store on eCrater.com, OR you can make your purchase via my Etsy and CQout stores, too. Click any of the links on the main page that you come to when you search for my blog….any of those links will take you to my other stores online.

Anyway, besides buying a camera here, you’ll find some really great stuff to tickle your fancy, ranging from news or tidbits about famous photographers, unknown photographers, film and digital camera news, 35mm film reviews, and lots, lots more. I usually aim to post at least once a day, but failing that, depending upon what tasks the wife has lined up for me, at least once or twice a week!

Aside of that, I will also talk about film noir, writing, my other love, street photography, and also on the odd occasion, anything that really bugs me. We’re all allowed to rant and rave about things in this world!

I try and arrange regular street photography sessions here in Vancouver BC as well, so please do keep dropping in regularly. The most recent street shoot went really well and was enjoyed thoroughly by all concerned…thank you for attending!

Other than that, I hope you enjoy reading this blog, and in the fashion of that famous phrase “me casa, su casa”, this blog is my blog….and your blog; if you don’t like anything in it, or feel there’s something missing, well, please let me know by your comments. I’d really appreciate that.

Oh, and a very, very warm welcome to the blog!         :)

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All content ©2014 by filmcamera999 and protected under a Creative Commons License.
Non-commercial use of this content is permitted with attribution and a link back to http://www.filmcamera999.wordpress.com

Posted in black & white photography, cellphone art photograhy, chemicals & film, Classic film cameras, digital cameras/accessories | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 12 Comments

Another classic camera offering for you!


Picture 328

I have talked about the fabulous Olympus 35SP many times before here, so I won’t bore you with superlatives…just Google it and the web will throw up thousands of pages about this classic.

So you will be pleased to read that I am offering another one from my collection again!

Click here to find out more….

Posted in best film cameras to buy, black & white photography, Classic film cameras | Tagged , , ,

A look back into the days of old England!


During my recent visit to the UK, I was walking around downtown London taking shots with my film cameras, when I came upon some very odd looking street lamps. Little did I know that I was looking at lamps that worked in the times long gone by. Read the actual report here…I think you will enjoy it!

The most magical job in Britain: Enchanting story of our last gas street lights, and the five men who keep them burning just as they did in Dickens’ day

  • There are just 1,500 gas lamps left in London, each one hand-lit by a member of a five man team every evening
  • The 19th-century lamps offer a glimpse of the city as it would have been during the time of Charles Dickens
  • Current team of London lamplighters are actually British Gas engineers – but their efforts go largely unsung
  • That the gas lamps have survived is partly a tribute to English Heritage, which has protected and restored them

When the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge next have an evening engagement, they might consider dismissing their chauffeur and setting out from Kensington Palace on foot. For on their doorstep is one of the most magical walks in London.

The long avenue of Kensington Palace Gardens, lined with embassies and the mansions of billionaires, is lit only by gas lamps. Their glass heads are a constellation of stars.

It is one of the rare places in the city where a walker can imagine what it might once have been like to walk the capital at night.

These glowing sentry posts are among the last Victorian gas lamps in London. In a city blazing with electricity, with office lights left on all night, these 19th-century survivors offer a glimpse of the city as it was when Charles Dickens wrote his dark and smoggily gripping novels.

There are 1,500 gas lamps left in London – but hundreds of thousands of electric street lights. Westminster alone has 14,000 glaring electric lamps.

But who keeps London’s gas lights burning?

They are evangelical about the particular beauty of their charges. Iain Bell, who oversees the operation, runs his hands over the posts like an antiquarian examining a classical sculpture.

Fellow engineer John Blanchard insists that the title ‘lamplighter’ doesn’t go far enough. ‘We are,’ he says proudly, ‘the Guardians of the Lamps.’

Before such men existed, London was a dark city. In the 18th century, it was a brave walker who ventured out without servants to lead the way with a lamp in one hand and a cudgel in the other.

Those who could not afford to keep servants would pay a few coins to a ‘link boy’, named after their ‘links’ or torch wicks.

These wild street urchins, the sons of harlots and thieves, would walk ahead, carrying a stick with a rag dipped in tar and set alight. Some were cutpurses, leading their customers into courts and alleyways and stealing what they could in the darkness. Yet they were preyed on in turn.

The link boys were vulnerable to the attentions of unscrupulous men who would have their way with the boys for a few more farthings.

Those who couldn’t afford to be guided in the dark took their chances — or rushed home before sunset.

Then, in 1807, an extraordinary conjuring trick was performed on Pall Mall.

To celebrate the birthday of King George III, Frederick Winsor, an engineer, lit the most spectacular of candles. To gasping crowds, he instantly illuminated a line of gas lamps.

Each one was fed with gas pipes made from the barrels of old musket guns and all Winsor had to do was apply a single spark to light up the whole street. The Mall was almost impassable with spectators until after midnight.

Over the following decades, thousands of gas lamps went up across London.

Many panicked about the new-fangled technology — explosions were alarmingly common in the early days — but for the first time in its history, London was safe, relatively speaking, to walk at night. The Victorian periodical The Westminster Review wrote that the introduction of gas lamps had done more to eliminate immorality and criminality on the streets than any number of church sermons.

While some lamplighters change the mantles of the lamps outside Buckingham Palace at four in the morning to avoid the tourists, John likes to be up his ladder at the busiest times, revelling in his role as Lamp Guardian.

The Palace is happy to let the lamplighters shimmy up their posts, but our politicians are more precious. The Houses of Parliament look after their own lamps.

Hyde Park, too, has its own lamplighters, but otherwise, Iain and his team maintain 1,300 gas lamps from Richmond Bridge in the West to Bromley-by-Bow in the East.

The oldest lamps light up the inside of Westminster Abbey; the newest frame the statue of the Queen Mother near the Palace.

John helps me climb level with one of the lamps in Smith Square. What strikes you as you open the glass window is the rush of warmth — welcome on a drizzling evening in November.

In daylight, each lamp burns with a tiny pilot light — if you look up on a grey and overcast day you can just see the flicker. At dusk, a timer fitted to each lamp moves a lever to release a stronger stream of gas which gives enough power to light up the mantles.

It’s a wonderful trick. John manipulates the mechanism to show me the moment when the gas shoots up. The four mantles come on one at a time — flash! flash! flash! flash! — until the whole lamp shines.

In nearby Pickering Place, a gloomily Dickensian courtyard with half-timbered houses, Iain talks regretfully of the sheer waste of light in London. In Carlton Gardens, he points out the smart offices of an aerospace company. The desks are deserted, but lights are on at every window.

For a man who cherishes gas lamps, the careless second-hand wasted light from the offices is an insult.

Each lamp is marked with the crest of the monarch in the year they were erected. During the great smogs of the 19th and early 20th centuries, it was possible for a man to find his way home by spotting the glow of the lantern, then feeling the markings on the post to work out where he was in the city.

Outside the five-star Savoy Hotel is a rare example of a ‘sewer lamp’. Its post is hollow and extends beneath the pavement to the great sewer below. The lamp was designed to extract foul smells and burn them off before they could reach the delicate nostrils of guests in the hotel’s suites.

Since the 19th century, almost all the lamps have been extended to raise their lanterns above the height of traffic. Modern delivery vans and lorries are rather taller than horse-drawn carriages and sedan chairs. When a lorry does drive into a lamp, which they do regrettably often, it is re-cast and put back exactly as it was.

The lamps that stand today have survived the coming of electric light, the Blitz and the best efforts of London’s lorry drivers. Their survival is testament to the care of generations of lamplighters.

In 1939, the journalist H. V. Morton wrote a book called the Ghosts Of London, which lamented the loss of the lamplighters who were once seen on every street at dusk. There were 412 of them then.

‘We’re the last of the old brigade,’ one of them told Morton.

Today, there are just the five lamplighters left. It is thanks to them that this remarkable part of the city’s history has endured and that in a few squares and parks and alleyways, it is still possible to walk the glowing streets which, long before electric light pollution, Dickens himself would have walked.

Important job: Before lamplighters existed, London was a dark city. In the 18th century, it was a brave walker who ventured out without servants to lead the way with a lamp in one hand and a cudgel in the other

Taken entirely from the UK newspaper Daily Mail….
Posted in 1960s London, Classic film cameras, journaling & writing, vintage camera reviews | Tagged , , , | 2 Comments

Learn


filmcamera999:

nostalgia galore!

Originally posted on ArtiZenImages Maureen Medina Fine Art Photography :

” The more things that you read, the more things you will know.

The more that you learn, the more places you’ll go!” ~ Dr. Seuss

Go Far..... Go Far…..

View original

Posted in Classic film cameras

A site for sore eyes…!


Just recently, I received a follow on here from a young lady

who has a fascinating ability to write really wonderfully ethereal

stuff!

So I mosied over to her blog, and found an even greater point of

interest….it’s her Tumblr page….check it out, I think it’s fab!

;)

Posted in Classic film cameras

A very Merry Xmas and a Happy and peaceful, healthy New Year to you all…!


Posted in Classic film cameras | 4 Comments

A view of downtown Vancouver that may disappear soon…


dte1Picture 621

The other day, I managed to catch a glimpse of something that may not last very long in that part of downtown Vancouver called the DTE…the downtown east.

Sure, the area has it’s problems…substance abuse is rife…as is homelessness and prostitution.

In a way, some of the people themselves are to blame, as the Govt has apparently setup shelters for the homeless many times, but the people concerned prefer to live on the streets.

Nothing new….much the same goes on in any city around the world.

The first picture above has accidentally captured 3 main things that are set to happen soon in the DTE….the first is redevelopemnt…I ahve circled the start of it in the photo….that building used to be a magnet for the homeless and drug traffickers just earlier this year…since the Govt decided to bulldoze the old building and redevelop it as new apartments and commercial premises below, the problems have disappeared.

In a way, I find it cruel, but also liberating…it is making the area safer and bringing in more trade.

The next photo shows a group of people openly dealing with drugs on a side street…the same street also has hookers in the evening touting for business from passing motorists. This too will most probably disappear once the redevelopment picks up pace…a bad thing? Tell me what you think!

And finally, third…see that part of the street in the second photo where the tarmac has come off? You can just make out the olde worlde cobbles that the street used to be paved with…a bit of history that again, will go once new road surfaces are laid out.

So, and innocent shot, but which has captured so much. A picture can tell a thousand words!

:)

Posted in black & white photography, Classic film cameras, journaling & writing | Tagged , , , , , ,

More life for your cellphone…!


Fact 1 — this post has nothing to do with cameras!

Fact 2 — the subject of this post is always at the back of every cellphone user’s mind

So, with the above as footnote, here is what you need to do to eke out the use of your iPhone for as long as possible…like me, I’m sure your phone has conked out at the very time you need it most!

1 Turn down the brightness level when you can.

2 If you need even more juice, shut off wireless connections such as Bluetooth and Wi-Fi.

3 We were always told to discharge your battery all the way every time you used it. That went away in the 1990s, when we started using lithium-ion. Even so, it’s still a good idea to exercise a battery once a month: Run it until the device turns off, and then charge it until full. That will keep it charging up to capacity.

4 Kill background app updates.
The last thing you need when your battery life is hanging on for dear life is some random photo app you downloaded three months ago sucking the life out of your phone while it updates.

Turn it off by going to Settings → iTunes & App Store. Scroll down, and under a section called Automatic Downloads you’ll see Updates. Turn that off. But, remember, this means you’ll need to either update your apps manually or remember to turn this feature on again when you’re at a full charge.

5 Switch off wi-fi, Bluetooth and location services, until such a time when you really need them.

These are a few of the most draining functions that kill battery life…for more tips, click here

 

Posted in cellphone art photograhy, Classic film cameras, journaling & writing | 2 Comments

A few shots taken just yesterday…..!


I don’t know about you, but I just relish the rainy weather, especially when I’m not working!

Even when it’s pouring down, and if I have time to spare, nothing will stop me from making a boiling hot cup of coffee, grabbing my umbrella, and walking out in the downpour, coffee in one had, umbrella in the other, into my garden, to just stand there watching and listening to the magical sights and sounds of primordial rain.

And sometimes, I even have my camera with me to record some of that magic.

So it was yesterday, when I captured these few shots here….I think they capture that magic quite nicely!

Picture 614

Picture 615

:)

Posted in Classic film cameras | 4 Comments

For the 10, 000th time…why I shoot film!


It’s an everygreen question I get asked every time people see me using my classic film cameras in town….downtown Vancouver BC that is.

Why do I still shoot film?

It’s such a loaded question, that once I start, the conversation carries on for an hour or more, usually within the comfort of my favorite coffee shops in Water Street, Main and Hastings, or Yaletown!

So here are my reasons, encapsulated and bottled up in neat little packages for everyone to remember! But don’t forget, this is what I think about film….your ideas may be completely different to mine, in whihc case, let’s beg to differ!

1 Probably the number one reason I use film is because I like the way my prints look when I create them in my darkroom  It’s the closest representation that I have ever seen to what I visualize in my minds eye

2 I can produce prints with film, not possible if I used a digital camera.

3 Film images have a three-dimensional unknown x-factor quality, as opposed to a harsher almost sterile look that you see with digital.  This has to do with the way that our eyes work. Seems to be somewhat true about hi-fi music as well, played using traditional vinyl records on a turntable with stylus etc and of course, valve powered amplifier system! That opposed to digital music.

4 Skin tones on film beat digital every time.  It isn’t even a close call.  Buy a roll of Kodak Portra 400 and take some portraits and then do the same with your digital SLR.  The skin tones are far superior with the Portra, but you can judge for yourself.

5 This one’s the trump card….A frame of 35mm film scanned is approximately equal to a 21 to 25 Mp DSLR.  When you get into medium format (6×6, 6×7, 6×9) or large format (4×5) you would need a 200MP to 300MP digital camera to even come close to matching film.  Even then you would end up with an image that you may not prefer.

6 Film is always sharp.  No need buy third party software packages.  With digital if you don’t sharpen your photos you are in trouble quickly.  I can use any of my film cameras with b/w film and either make prints or scans without any “sharpening” to produce crisp photos without any extra effort.

7 I personally enjoy touching and handling film.  I love developing my own film and when I create black and white fine art prints the experience from capture to the final print is unrivaled by anything I can do in the digital world.  A silver gelatin print on archival fine art paper is the gold standard for collectors.

photo courtesy lifeartworks.com

:)

Posted in Classic film cameras

Hey! Im still here guys! Dont go away!


Despite what youre all thinking, no, I haven’t jumped off the Lions Gate bridge here in Vancouver…nor have I fled the country…nor have I defected to the Soviet Union…(it doesnt exist any more!).

Im still here, but snowed under with so much work taht has overtaken me very quickly!

Will tell you more later…but I started an advertising agency specialising in Formual 1 racing  plus other high profile sports.

The work coming in has gone thru the roof!

Im looking for extra staff soon….the usual rules apply….blonde, tall, must be wearing red stilettos and be at my beck and call 24/7…ahem…no, only joking..but that would be so coooool!

Seriously, I need partners with connections or experience of sports advertising, venue marketing, cold calling etc ideally.

But heres the low down….due to it being a new business, it cannot sustain salaries! you get paid commisson only, to start with.

Just drop me a comment here if interested. If you are prepared to hack it for the long term, huge potential is in sight!

Chow!

PS Marina…you cant apply…youre not blonde….;) lol

 

Posted in journaling & writing | Tagged , , , , , | 6 Comments